Lauren Turner-Brown named Assistant Director for the University of North Carolina TEACCH Autism Program

Lauren Turner-Brown named Assistant Director for the University of North Carolina TEACCH Autism Program click to enlarge Lauren Turner-Brown

We are pleased to announce that Lauren Turner-Brown has been named Assistant Director for the University of North Carolina TEACCH Autism Program effective July 1, 2014

Lauren Turner-Brown has been named Assistant Director for the University of North Carolina TEACCH Autism Program effective July 1, 2014. In this new role, she will provide clinical administrative support for TEACCH and conduct clinical research within the TEACCH regional centers.  Specifically, she will coordinate and provide oversight of the early intervention and preschool services and research programs at TEACCH.  She will serve as the Research Liaison between TEACCH and the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities with the goal of expanding collaborative autism intervention research at UNC. Dr. Turner-Brown is a clinical psychologist who will retain her academic appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry. This position is jointly supported by the TEACCH Autism Program and the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities.

Lauren received her bachelor degree in Psychology from Davidson College and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Vanderbilt University. Since completing her doctorate, Lauren completed her clinical internship at TEACCH and has since been working within the larger autism research community at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities. The focus of her research is on gaining a better understanding of the autism phenotype to promote accurate early detection and to develop and test more targeted interventions for individuals with autism.  She has many years of experience with individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder of all ages. Lauren specializes in clinical and research experience with early screening, identification and intervention for toddlers, as well as experience training current and future professionals.  Some of her current research focuses on examining the efficacy of structured teaching for toddlers and their families in rural communities.